Reforming the police through procedural justice training: A multicity randomized trial at crime hot spots

David Weisburd*, Cody W. Telep, Heather Vovak, Taryn Zastrow, Anthony A. Braga, Brandon Turchan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

SignificanceOur study is a randomized trial in policing confirming that intensive training in procedural justice (PJ) can lead to more procedurally just behavior and less disrespectful treatment of people at high-crime places. The fact that the PJ intervention reduced arrests by police officers, positively influenced residents' perceptions of police harassment and violence, and also reduced crime provides important guidance for police reform in a period of strong criticism of policing. This randomized trial points to the potential for PJ training not simply to encourage fair and respectful policing but also to improve evaluations of the police and crime prevention effectiveness.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbere2118780119
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume119
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 5 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2022 the Author(s).

Keywords

  • hot spots policing
  • police training
  • procedural justice
  • randomized controlled trial

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