Regression of established murine carcinoma metastases following vaccination with tumour-associated antigen peptides

Ofer Mandelboim, Ezra Vadai, Mati Fridkin, Anne Katz-Hillel, Michael Feldman, Gideon Berke, Lea Eisenbach*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

149 Scopus citations

Abstract

The cure of micrometastases following surgery is the major goal of cancer immunotherapy. We have recently isolated tumour-associated antigen (TAA) peptides, MUT 1 and MUT 2, derived from a mutated connexin 37 gap-junction protein, from the malignant 3LL-D122 murine lung carcinoma. We now report that synthetic MUT 1 or MUT 2 induces effective antitumour cytoxic T lymphocytes. Peptide vaccines protect mice from spontaneous metastases of 3LL-D122 tumours. Moreover, peptide vaccines reduce metastatic loads in mice carrying pre-established micrometastases. Tumour-specific immunity was primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells. This is the first evidence that peptide therapy may be effective in treatment of residual tumours and provides a rationale for the development of peptide vaccines as a modality for cancer therapy.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1179-1183
Number of pages5
JournalNature Medicine
Volume1
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1995
Externally publishedYes

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