Rehabilitative Beit Midrash as a means for advancing the community integration of Ultra Orthodox Jewish persons with severe mental illness

Ron Shor*, Guy Avihod

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Religious Jews with severe mental illness often encounter barriers to involvement in religious activities in their community affecting their ability to become integrated into their community. Therefore, a study was conducted in Israel examining the contribution to community integration through a programme providing religious persons with mental illness an opportunity to participate in religious studies. An A-B research design was implemented among 42 Ultra-Orthodox Jewish persons with severe mental illness utilising a culturally-oriented structured instrument. The study showed that the opportunity for involvement in religious studies could advance the participants’ sense of social interaction in their community as well as their sense of psychological integration with other religious people. It also strengthened their confidence in their ability to further get involved in religious studies in the community. Rehabilitation services providing persons with severe mental illness an opportunity for involvement in religious studies can act as a springboard for advancing their community integration.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)698-706
Number of pages9
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume21
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Aug 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Mental illness
  • Ultra Orthodox Jews
  • community integration
  • mental health services
  • rehabilitation
  • religion

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