Resisting Bacteria and Attracting Cells: Spontaneous Formation of a Bifunctional Peptide-Based Coating by On-Surface Assembly Approach

Sivan Yuran, Alona Dolid, Meital Reches*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Due to extension of life expectancy, millions of people suffer nowadays from bone and dental malfunctions that can only be treated by different types of implants. However, these implants tend to fail due to bacterial infection and lack of integration with the remaining tissue. Here, we demonstrate a new concept in which we use specifically designed peptides, in a "Lego-like" manner to endow multiple preprogrammed functions. We developed a bifunctional peptide-based coating that simultaneously rejects the adhesion of infecting bacteria and attracts cells that build the new connecting tissue. The peptide design contains fluorinated phenylalanine that mediates the self-assembly of the peptide into a coating that resists bacterial adhesion. It also includes an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif that attracts mammalian cells. The whole compound is attached to the surface using a third unit, the amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA). This novel, yet very simple approach is significantly advantageous for practical use and synthesis. More importantly, this peptide design can serve as a general platform for generating functional coatings.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)4051-4061
Number of pages11
JournalACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Dec 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 American Chemical Society.

Keywords

  • biofilm
  • cell adhesion
  • implants
  • peptides
  • self-assembly

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