Resting mononuclear cell NR3C1 and SKA2 expression levels predict blunted cortisol reactivity to combat training stress among elite army cadets exposed to childhood adversity

Carmel Kalla, Tanya Goltser-Dubner, Dalya Pevzner, Laura Canetti, Aron Mirman, Ariel Ben-Yehuda, Noa Itzhar, Fortu Benarroch, Amit Shalev, Ruth Giesser, Eyal Fruchter, Inon Vashdi, Osnat Oz, Roni Haber, Chen Saloner, Amit Lotan, Esti Galili-Weisstub, Omer Bonne, Ronen Segman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Childhood adversity (CA) may alter reactivity to stress throughout life, increasing risk for psychiatric and medical morbidity, yet long-term correlates of milder CA levels among high functioning healthy adolescents are less studied. The current study examined the prevalence and impact of CA exposure among a cohort of healthy motivated elite parachute unit volunteers, prospectively assessed at rest and at the height of an intensive combat-simulation exposure. We found significantly reduced gene expression levels in resting mononuclear cell nuclear receptor, subfamily 3, member 1 (NR3C1), and its transactivator spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2), that predict blunted cortisol reactivity to combat-simulation stress among CA exposed adolescents. Long-term alterations in endocrine immune indices, subjective distress, and executive functions persist among healthy high functioning adolescents following milder CA exposure, and may promote resilience or vulnerability to later real-life combat exposure.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6680-6687
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited.

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