Seroprevalence of bovine ephemeral fever virus in domesticated and wildlife species during epidemic and inter-epidemic periods (2000-2009) in Israel

O. Aziz-Boaron, S. Brettschneider, R. King, B. Gelman, E. Klement*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bovine ephemeral fever (BEF) is an economically important vector-borne viral disease of cattle and buffalo. It has been reported from most of the world's tropical and subtropical regions. In the last few decades, outbreaks of BEF have occurred in Israel almost every other year. Several serological studies have demonstrated a wide range of wild animal species that are positive for BEF virus (BEFV) antibodies. However, the question of whether wild animals and domesticated species other than cattle also play an important role in the maintenance and transmission of BEFV in Israel remains. Here, we examined the prevalence of anti-BEFV antibodies in 942 samples collected from various wild, semi-captive and domesticated animal species during the years 2000-2009 using the serum neutralization (SN) method. SN test revealed the presence of BEFV-neutralizing antibodies in nine samples (0.96%), from three species: Bubalus bubalis (4/29, 13.79%), Gazella g. gazella (3/68, 4.44%) and Dama d. mesopotamica (2/296, 0.68%). All positive samples were collected in areas of earlier outbreaks. The low prevalence of positive animals and the solid correlation with prior outbreaks indicate that the tested species probably do not serve as virus reservoirs and may play only a minor role in the maintenance of BEFV in the Middle East.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
JournalTransboundary and Emerging Diseases
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

Keywords

  • Arbovirus
  • Bovine ephemeral fever
  • Epidemiology
  • Reservoir
  • Wildlife

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