Shorter cortical adaptation in dyslexia is broadly distributed in the superior temporal lobe and includes the primary auditory cortex

Sagi Jaffe-Dax, Eva Kimel, Merav Ahissar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Studies of the performance of individuals with dyslexia in perceptual tasks suggest that their implicit inference of sound statistics is impaired. Previously, using two-tone frequency discrimination, we found that the effect of previous trials' frequencies on the judgments of individuals with dyslexia decays faster than the effect on controls' judgments, and that the adaptation (decrease of neural response to repeated stimuli) of their ERP responses to tones is shorter (<xref ref-type="bibr" rid="bib22">Jaffe-Dax et al., 2017</xref>). Here, we show the cortical distribution of these abnormal dynamics of adaptation using fast-acquisition fMRI. We find that faster decay of adaptation in dyslexia is widespread, although the most significant effects are found in the left superior temporal lobe, including the auditory cortex. This broad distribution suggests that the faster decay of implicit memory of individuals with dyslexia is a general characteristic of their cortical dynamics, which also affects sensory cortices.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbere30018
JournaleLife
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Feb 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Jaffe-Dax et al.

Keywords

  • adaptation
  • dyslexia
  • fMRI
  • human
  • implicit memory
  • neuroscience

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