Socioeconomic status at birth is associated with risk of schizophrenia: Population-based multilevel study

Shirli Werner, Dolores Malaspina, Jonathan Rabinowitz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

137 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Inconsistent findings obscure understanding the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and schizophrenia. The aim of the current study was to test the association between individual and community SES at birth and risk of schizophrenia. Method: Population-based longitudinal follow forward study of a 13-year birth cohort (n = 71 165). Effects of individual and community socioeconomic variables were examined using multilevel regression in MLwiN. Results: Years of education of fathers and mothers, respectively, (0-8 vs 13+ odds ratio [OR] = 1.17, P < .0001; OR = 1.14, P < .001) lower occupational status of fathers (OR = 1.29, P = .036), and poorer residential area SES (OR = 1.26, P = .012) were risk factors for schizophrenia. Conclusions: Individual- and community-level SES at the time of birth are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1373-1378
Number of pages6
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Multilevel analyses
  • Parental education
  • Parental occupation
  • Residential area
  • Social causation theory
  • Social selection theory

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