Solution-Processed Semitransparent CZTS Thin-Film Solar Cells via Cation Substitution and Rapid Thermal Annealing

Shin Woei Leow, Wenjie Li, Joel Ming Rui Tan, Selvaraj Venkataraj, Venkatesh Tunuguntla, Mengyuan Zhang, Shlomo Magdassi, Lydia Helena Wong*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Semitransparent solar cells are able to capitalize on land scarcity in urban environments by co-opting windows and glass structures as power generators, thereby expanding the capacity of photovoltaics to meet energy needs. To be successful, devices must be efficient, possess good visual transparency, long-term stability, and low cost. Copper zinc tin sulfide is a promising thin-film material that consists of earth-abundant elements. For optical transparency, the usual molybdenum back contact is replaced with a transparent conducting oxide (TCO). However, due to subsequent high-temperature annealing, the TCO degrades, losing conductivity, or forms a poor interface with CZTS. Lower temperatures mitigate this issue but hinder grain growth in CZTS films. Herein, cadmium substitution and silver and sodium doping are used to aid grain growth and improve film quality at lower annealing temperatures. Thin molybdenum is sputtered on TCO to help improve the interface transition postannealing by conversion to MoS2. Rapid thermal processing is used to minimize high-temperature exposure time to preserve the TCO. With these methods, a semitransparent device with a front illumination efficiency of 2.96% is demonstrated.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number2100131
JournalSolar RRL
Volume5
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Wiley-VCH GmbH

Keywords

  • cation substitutions
  • copper zinc tin sulfides
  • rapid thermal annealing
  • semitransparent solar cells
  • solution processes

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