Speeding and the time-saving bias: How drivers' estimations of time saved in higher speed affects their choice of speed

Eyal Peer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

According to the time-saving bias, drivers overestimate the time saved when increasing from an already relatively high speed and underestimate the time saved when increasing from a relatively low speed. This study examined the effect the time-saving bias may have on drivers' choice of speed using hypothetical situations. Drivers were presented with a situation involving acceleration from a relatively low speed in order to arrive at a destination on time and were asked to estimate the time that could be saved by increasing to higher speeds. Drivers also estimated the speed required for arriving on time, the speed they would personally choose and the speed they believed other drivers would opt for in such a situation. Results showed that drivers indeed underestimated the time that could be saved by increasing from a low speed. In addition, drivers who showed a high time-saving bias (above median) indicated notably higher speeds in all three categories above and their indicated speeds exceeded the speed limit more frequently. These findings suggest that the time-saving bias may help explain why drivers, in some situations, prefer an overly high speed and violate the legal speed limit.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1978-1982
Number of pages5
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was sponsored by a grant from the Israeli National Road Safety Authority. The author wishes to thank Elisha Babad Eyal Gamliel for their guidance and support, Ola Svenson and three anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments, and to Moran Avraham for collection of data.

Keywords

  • Journey time
  • Speeding
  • Time estimation
  • Time-saving bias

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Speeding and the time-saving bias: How drivers' estimations of time saved in higher speed affects their choice of speed'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this