Spontaneous Contact and Intergroup Attitudes in Asymmetric Protracted Ethno-National Conflict: East Jerusalem Palestinian Students in an Israeli Academic Setting

Nitzan Faibish, Noorman Rajabi, Dan Miodownik*, Ifat Maoz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of East Jerusalem Palestinian students studying at Israeli higher education institutions in Israel and in preacademic preparatory programs. This study examines howspontaneous encounters with Jewish students while attending an Israeli academic institution are associated with young East Jerusalem Palestinian students’ attitudes toward the integration of East Jerusalem Palestinians into the city of Jerusalemand cooperation with Israeli Jews. Weanalyze the responses to an online survey of 106 East Jerusalem Palestinian students attending a 1-year preparatory program at an Israeli academic institute.We find that Palestinian students who report spontaneous contact with Jewish students on campus during the year express more favorable attitudes toward the integration of East Jerusalem Palestinians into the city of Jerusalem and more positive attitudes toward Jewish Israelis in general.

Original languageAmerican English
JournalPeace and Conflict
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 American Psychological Association

Keywords

  • East Jerusalem
  • Israeli–Palestinian conflict
  • intergroup contact
  • spontaneous contact

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