Striatal Neurons Are Recruited Dynamically into Collective Representations of Self-Initiated and Learned Actions in Freely Moving Mice

Lior Tiroshi*, Yara Atamna, Naomi Gilin, Noa Berkowitz, Joshua A. Goldberg*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Striatal spiny projection neurons are hyperpolarized-at-rest (HaR) and driven to action potential threshold by a small number of powerful inputs—an input–output configuration that is detrimental to response reliability. Because the striatum is important for habitual behaviors and goal-directed learning, we conducted a microendoscopic imaging in freely moving mice that express a genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator sparsely in striatal HaR neurons to evaluate their response reliability during self-initiated movements and operant conditioning. The sparse expression was critical for longitudinal studies of response reliability, and for studying correlations among HaR neurons while minimizing spurious correlations arising from contamination by the background signal. We found that HaR neurons are recruited dynamically into action representation, with distinct neuronal subsets being engaged in a moment-by-moment fashion. While individual neurons respond with little reliability, the population response remained stable across days. Moreover, we found evidence for the temporal coupling between neuronal subsets during conditioned (but not innate) behaviors.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numberENEURO.0315-23.2023
JournaleNeuro
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024, Society for Neuroscience. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • basal ganglia
  • calcium imaging
  • correlations
  • parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons
  • population coding
  • spiny projection neurons

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Striatal Neurons Are Recruited Dynamically into Collective Representations of Self-Initiated and Learned Actions in Freely Moving Mice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this