Strong government influence over the Israeli health care system has led to low rates of spending growth

Jack Zwanziger*, Shuli Brammli-Greenberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Israel reformed its health care system in 1995. In contrast to many other developed nations, it has since experienced relatively low rates of growth in health spending, even as health outcomes have continued to improve. This paper describes characteristics of the Israeli system that have helped control rising costs. We describe how the national government exerts direct operational control over a large proportion of total health care expenditures (39.1 percent in 2007) through a range of mechanisms, including caps on hospital revenue and national contracts with salaried physicians. The Ministry of Finance has been able to persuade the national government to agree to relatively small increases in the health care budget because the system has performed well, with a very high level of public satisfaction. It is unclear whether this success in health expenditure control can be sustained because of growing signs of strain within the system, the rapid increase in nongovernment financing for health care services, and the growing prosperity of Israeli society.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1779-1785
Number of pages7
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Strong government influence over the Israeli health care system has led to low rates of spending growth'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this