Studying International Relations through Horror Films: A New Approach and Illustrations from Cannon Fodder and Freak out

Oren Barak, Daphne Inbar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper argues that works of popular culture, specifically horror films, offer valuable insights into dominant and critical perceptions of the sources of violence in ongoing armed conflicts- A n issue of concern for scholars of International Relations (IR) scholars, which as yet has not received sufficient attention. Accordingly, we present a new approach that IR scholars can utilize in their analysis of works of popular culture, applying it to two recent horror films from Israel/Palestine: Cannon Fodder (2013, dir. Eitan Gafny) and Freak Out (2015, dir. Boaz Armoni). The analysis of these films, combined with a discussion of films dealing with violence from other contexts, reveals how works of popular culture in general, and horror films in particular, can help address the question of whether violence in armed conflicts is perceived as endogenous or exogenous to the groups involved. This can also shed light on specific issues, such as the connection between social representation and violence, the link between the use of military technology and violence, and the blurred boundaries between endogenous and exogenous sources of violence.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)160-180
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Studies Perspectives
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Israel/Palestine
  • conflict
  • horror films
  • popular culture
  • violence

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