Subjective well-being and perceptions of safety among Jewish and Arab children in Israel

Asher Ben-Arieh*, Edna Shimon

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

As research has shown, safety is also a subjective phenomenon. Contemporary scholarship has also underscored the importance of subjective well-being among children as a vital component of overall well-being. Our paper explores the potential relationship between reported levels of safety in different settings and the subjective well-being of children. We conducted our study on 2238 children ages 10 and 12 with varying sociodemographic characteristics. Our findings support our hypothesis that safety in different settings is positively inter-correlated and that safety perceptions are positively correlated with subjective well-being. Furthermore, the correlations exist among different sociodemographic groups and in different settings.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalChildren and Youth Services Review
Volume44
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • Quality of life
  • Safety
  • Subjective well-being

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