Testing Possible Mechanisms of Deficient Supra-Second Time Estimation in Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Y. Pollak*, N. Kroyzer, A. Yakir, M. Friedler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Numerous studies indicate deficient time estimation in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several hypotheses have been raised to explain this deficit including delay aversion, vulnerability to nontemporal distractions, deficient working memory, as well as pure deficit in temporal processing. To test the different hypotheses, adults with or without ADHD performed a prospective time-estimation task under different conditions: with or without nontemporal distraction; and with or without increased load of working memory. Such design was used to rule out the effect of motor control and to manipulate the hypothesized mechanisms of working memory and attention to nontemporal stimuli. The authors report that compared with the control group, adults with ADHD showed greater and more variable deviation in time estimation. In addition, the magnitude of time estimation was affected by allocation of attention to nontemporal stimuli and by load of working memory. The intraindividual variability of time estimation was only partially accounted for by load of working memory. These findings suggest that the ADHD-associated deficit in prospective time estimation is not attributable to special attention to nontemporal stimuli or compromised working memory.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)679-686
Number of pages8
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Keywords

  • attention to nontemporal stimuli
  • attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • time estimation
  • working memory

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