The adenylate cyclase/protein kinase cascade regulates entry into meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the gene IME1

Akira Matsuura*, Millet Treinin, Hiroshi Mitsuzawa, Yona Kassir, Isao Uno, Giora Simchen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Entry into meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells is regulated by starvation through the adenylate cyclase/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (AC/PK) pathway. The gene IME1 is also involved in starvation control of meiosis. Multicopy IME1 plasmids overcome the meiotic deficiency of bcy1 and of RASval19 diploids. Double mutants ime1 cdc25 and ime1 ras2 are sporulation deficient. These results suggest that IME1 comes after the AC/PK cascade. Furthermore, the level of IME1 transcripts is affected by mutations in the AC/PK genes CDC25, CYR1 and BCY1 Moreover, the addition of cAMP to a cyr1-2 diploid suppresses IME1 transcription. The presence in a bcy1 diploid of IME1 multicopy plasmids does not cure the failure of bcy1 cells to arrest as unbudded cells following starvation and to enter the G0 state (thermotolerance, synthesis of unique G0 proteins). This indicates that the pathway downstream of the AC/PK cascade branches to control meiosis through IME1, and to control entry into G0 and cell cycle initiation, independently of IME1.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)3225-3232
Number of pages8
JournalEMBO Journal
Volume9
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1990

Keywords

  • IME1 gene
  • Meiosis
  • Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • cAMP cascade

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