The amphibians and reptiles of the 1962-1965 Yale University Prehistoric Expedition to Nubia

Gregory J. Watkins-Colwell*, Alex Dornburg, Dror Hawlena, Jon A. Moore

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Yale University Prehistoric Expedition to Nubia collected zoological specimens and archeological artifacts from Egypt and the surrounding region from 1962 to 1965. A total of 2486 herpetological specimens were collected during this time, representing 51 species and 13 families. Among the herpetological specimens is a series of 1232 Chalcides ocellatus and a recently described species of spitting cobra (Naja nubiae). Because most of the collection sites are now under Lake Nasser, most specimens represent extirpated populations. Some specimens are of taxa now considered endangered species in Egypt. Although the primary purpose of the YUPEN expedition was to preserve the rich anthropological history south of Aswan, the herpetological specimens that were preserved provide a valuable temporal snapshot into the historical ecosystems that were present in Lower Egypt.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)179-197
Number of pages19
JournalBulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Amphibian
  • Aswan dam
  • Chalcides
  • Egypt
  • Naja
  • Nubia
  • Reptile

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