The causation-prevention chain in infrastructure safety measures: A consideration of four types of policy lock-ins

Victoria Gitelman*, Sigal Kaplan, Shalom Hakkert

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Safety policies typically follow Lasswell's linear decision cycle paradigm: diagnostics, prescription, application, monitoring, and appraisal. Contemporary policy research highlights the existence of complexities in policy-making, which trigger policy lock-ins. We consider four cases in which the complex nature of the causation-prevention discourse leads to decision-making lock-ins, which deter safety progress. The four cases are conflicting narratives, missing causation inferences, prevention and mobility mismatch, and a tension between policy transfer and existing policy environments. The cases are demonstrated on recent examples of infrastructure measures that were observed in Israeli practice, which are, respectively: adding a motorway illumination, setting bus priority routes, safety improvements of multi-lane urban roads, and establishing traffic calming areas. While the four case-studies are region-specific, the discussion is relevant to other road safety measures and countries with similar policy-making problems. The consideration highlights the importance of policy-making dynamics to increase the resilience of the Safe System approach.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number107399
JournalAccident Analysis and Prevention
Volume195
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023

Keywords

  • Causation-prevention discourse
  • Decision-making lock-ins
  • Road infrastructure
  • Safe System approach
  • Safety policy

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