The Dynamics of Non-Convergent Learning with a Conflicting Other: Internally Persuasive Discourse as a Framework for Articulating Successful Collaborative Learning

Yifat Ben David Kolikant*, Sarah Pollack

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Successful collaborative learning is often conceptualized in terms of convergence, a process through which participants' shared understanding increases. This conceptualization does not capture certain successful collaborative learning processes, especially in the humanities, where multiple perspectives are often celebrated. Such is the context of the current study, where 52 Israeli Jewish and 52 Israeli Arab high-school students collaboratively e-investigated a historical event related to the Israeli–Palestinian conflict. Utilizing a bi-dimensional qualitative analysis, we identified four discussion types, including fission, a non-convergent and disputatious process leading to successful collaborative learning outcomes Bakhtin's notion of Internally Persuasive Discourse highlights the quality of collaboration as manifested in the dialogic agency developed by discussants, regardless of whether or not their knowledge converged. It captures the essence of fission-like processes as well as convergence processes, and is hence useful in explaining a wider variety of learning situations, especially in multicultural and/or disputatious contexts.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)322-356
Number of pages35
JournalCognition and Instruction
Volume33
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Oct 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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