The earliest neolithic cultures of northeast China: Recent discoveries and new perspectives on the beginning of agriculture

G. Shelach*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although north China has long been recognized as one of the nuclear centers of agriculture, it is surprisingly absent from most recent publications on the beginnings of agriculture. New discoveries made in this region during the last 15 years are important contributions to our understanding of the transition to agriculture. Moreover, through these discoveries we can challenge the common view of north China as a homogeneous area of agricultural development. Through the introduction of the Xinglongwa (ca. 8000-6800 B.P.) and the Zhaobaogou (ca. 6800-6000 B.P.) cultures, the earliest sedentary societies in northeast China, I attempt to progress beyond generalizations, such as the useful model of the Chinese Interaction Sphere, and examine more thoroughly the developments in one subregion of north China. The data presented are used to address important issues associated with the transition to agriculture as well as to point to new avenues for future research in this field.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)363-413
Number of pages51
JournalJournal of World Prehistory
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Keywords

  • Agriculture
  • Neolithic
  • Northeast China
  • Xinglongwa
  • Zhaobaogou

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