The effect of tin(II) chloride adsorption on the electrochemical oxidation of tin(II) and other reactions at gold and platinum electrodes

Daniel Mandler*, Alien J. Bard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

During a study of the electrooxidation of tin(II) chloride at gold and platinum electrodes by cyclic voltammetry, a remarkable hysteresis was associated with the oxidation of tin(II) chloride that is attributed to the adsorption of tin(II) chloride on the gold electrode. The adsorbed tin(II) chloride inhibits the oxidation of the bulk tin(II) chloride and therefore shifts the potential for oxidation to more positive values. However, once the adsorbed tin(II) chloride is oxidized, the dissolved tin(II) chloride is oxidizable at less positive potentials. This inhibition by adsorbed tin(II) chloride also affects other inner-sphere electrode reactions (e.g., oxidation of I-), but not outer-sphere reactions. This inhibition is explained in terms of the need of a bridging ligand to facilitate electron transfer in inner sphere reactions. This inhibition is even more pronounced on Pt electrodes, where no oxidation wave for tin(II) chloride is observed. However, adsorption of chloride ions, 2-mercaptoethanol, or iodide causes desorption of the tin(II) chloride and the appearance of an irreversible wave for oxidation of the tin(II) in solution.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)217-228
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Electroanalytical Chemistry
Volume307
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 10 Jun 1991
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We appreciate the advice and helpful comments of Dr. David 0. Wipf. DM was supported by a Chaim Weizmann Fellowship. The support of this research by a grant from the National Science Foundation (CHE 8901450) is gratefully acknowledged.

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