The epidemiology of volatile substance misuse among school children in Bogotá, Colombia

Catalina Lopez-Quintero, Yehuda Neumark*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Volatile substance misuse (VSM) is increasing among Colombian youth. Rates and correlates of VSM, exposure-opportunity (EO) to VSM, and positive VSM intentions were examined in 2006 among 2,279 students (mean age 14.8 years) in 23 schools in Bogotá, Colombia. Sixteen percent experienced an EO, 3% reported past-year VSM, and 7-10% reported positive VSM intentions. Multilevel-logistic models revealed that VSM among friends was associated with past-year VSM (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 5.56, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.3-13.6) and VSM intention (AOR = 2.48, 95%CI = 1.6-3.9). Other correlates include male gender, a low perceived risk, and poor academic achievement. At-risk groups were identified, and targeted prevention strategies were suggested. The study's limitations are also noted.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)50-56
Number of pages7
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume46
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 24 May 2011

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The preparation and development of this work was funded by a Milstein Doctoral Training Fellowship to C. Lopez-Quintero at the Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Hebrew University-Hadassah, Israel. The authors wish to thank the schools and students who participated in the survey and the local health authorities for their cooperation. Address correspondance to Yehuda Neumark, Ph.D., Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Hebrew University-Hadassah, P.O. Box 12272, Jerusalem 91120, Israel; E-mail: [email protected]

Keywords

  • Colombia
  • Volatile substance misuse
  • drugs
  • exposure-opportunity (EO)
  • inhalant use
  • prevention
  • youth

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