The epistolary terms k't, k'nt in official Aramaic, the feminine endings in Aramaic dialects and other dialectal features in the history of Aramaic

Elitzur A. Bar-Asher Siegal*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper concentrates on the etymology of the epistolary terms k't, k'nt in Official Aramaic and proposes that they are related to the root k-'-n, used both in official correspondence from Middle Assyrian and in the Amarna letters. In this discussion various dialectal features in the history of Aramaic are discussed, among them: rule ordering with regards to the assimilation of the consonant -n, and the insertion of an anaptyxis between clusters of two final consonants; the existence of two allomorphs in Aramaic for the feminine ending, -at and -t; and a consideration of the existence of some connection between the dialect of the Sefire inscription and the dialect of the Hermopolis letters.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)199-231
Number of pages33
JournalAncient Near Eastern Studies
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

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