The impact of Arab-Israeli culture on the characteristics of the therapeutic encounter between women social workers and fathers in Arab parent–child centers

Edith Blit-Cohen, Romain Jammal-Abboud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Summary: The aim of the study was to present the impact of the Arab-Israeli culture on the therapeutic encounter between women social workers with fathers in Arab parent–child centers in Israel. The research was qualitative, and was based on in-depth interviews with 15 Arab women social workers employed in nine parent–child centers, where they treat Arab fathers. Findings: The social workers’ perceptions about the fathers’ perceptions of the therapeutic encounter has an impact on the professional encounter. In some cases, these perceptions were a hindrance to the treatment and necessitated work to help the father overcome these perceptions and to reduce his potential resistance to the treatment. In other cases, the social workers’ perceptions about the fathers’ perceptions advanced the treatment. A supportive attitude toward the treatment meant a better starting point, which was reflected throughout the therapeutic process, when the father believed in the treatment and accepted the idea of asking for help. Application: The study findings show the importance of the social workers’ awareness of the fathers’ cultural stance, as well as of the similarities and differences between their own cultural perceptions and that of the fathers.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)337-351
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Social Work Practice
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Jul 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016 GAPS.

Keywords

  • Arab society in Israel
  • culturally sensitive intervention
  • intervention with fathers
  • parent–child centers
  • social work

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