The Impact of Smoking Cessation on Hospitalization and Psychiatric Medication Utilization among People with Serious Mental Illness

Jennifer Kertes, Orit Stein Reisner, Leon Grunhaus, Yehuda Neumark*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Despite the high prevalence of smoking amongst people with serious mental illness (SMI), referral rates to smoking cessation programs (SCPs) are low. Mental health workers reticence to refer to SCPs has been attributed, in part, to their belief that quitting will have a deleterious effect on their patients’ mental health status. Objectives: This study’s objective was to determine if participating in a smoking cessation program had an adverse effect on mental health status among people with SMI, measured here by a change in hospitalization occurrence or psychiatric medication utilization. People with SMI who had participated in at least one SCP session in a large health maintenance organization (n = 403) were compared to an age-gender-diagnosis matched sample of SMI smokers (1,209) who had never participated. Results: No change in psychiatric hospitalization occurrence pre- versus post-SCP participation was found among participants (Pre:7.2% vs. Post:5.2, p = 0.2) or nonparticipants (Pre:7.0% vs. Post:6.0%, p = 0.2). Mean defined daily dose (DDD) for anti-psychotic, mood stabilizer, anti-depressant and anxiolytic medications also did not change over time for participants and nonparticipants. However, participants who did not complete the SCP and didn’t quit had a 0.35 higher mean DDD for anti-psychotic medications compared with participants who had completed the SCP or quit, and with nonparticipants (p = 0.006), and were the only group to exhibit an increase in mean antipsychotic DDD over time (Pre:1.42, Post:1.63). SCP participation was not associated with hospitalization occurrence or psychiatric medication utilization. Conclusions/Importance: Smoking cessation should be encouraged, with close monitoring during the quit process.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1543-1550
Number of pages8
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Smoking cessation
  • defined daily dose
  • hospitalization
  • medication utilization
  • psychotropic medications
  • serious mental illness

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