The influential child: How children affect their environment and influence their own risk and resilience

Maayan Davidov*, Ariel Knafo-Noam, Lisa A. Serbin, Ellen Moss

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Views regarding children's influence on their environment and their own development have undergone considerable changes over the years. Following Bell's (1968) seminal paper, the notion of children's influence and the view of socialization as a bidirectional process have gradually gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research implementing this theoretical advancement has lagged behind. This Special Section compiles a collection of new empirical works addressing multiple forms of influential child processes, with special attention to their consequences for children's and others' positive functioning, risk and resilience. By addressing a wide variety of child influences, this Special Section seeks to advance integration of influential child processes into myriad future studies on development and psychopathology and to promote the translation of such work into preventive interventions.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)947-951
Number of pages5
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Copyright Cambridge University Press 2015.

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