The Interaction of Motivation and Therapist Adherence Predicts Outcome in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Preliminary Findings

Jonathan D. Huppert*, David H. Barlow, Jack M. Gorman, M. Katherine Shear, Scott W. Woods

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

This report is a post-hoc, exploratory examination of the relationships among patient motivation, therapist protocol adherence, and panic disorder outcome in patients treated with cognitive behavioral therapy within the context of a randomized clinical trial for the treatment of panic disorder (Barlow, Gorman, Shear, & Woods, 2000). Results suggested that motivation and adherence interacted to predict change in panic severity. Among patients rated as less motivated, greater therapist protocol adherence was associated with poorer outcome. Among patients rated as more motivated, adherence was not significantly associated with outcome. Further process research is needed to confirm these preliminary results and to understand the interactions of patient and therapist factors and how they are related to outcome in standardized protocols such as cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)198-204
Number of pages7
JournalCognitive and Behavioral Practice
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by NIMH Grant No. MH45964 (Shear; Pittsburgh); MH45965 (Barlow; Boston); MH45966 (Woods; Yale); MH45963 and MH00416 (Senior Scientist Award) (Gorman; Columbia/Mt. Sinai). Dr. Shear is now at Columbia University School of Social Work.

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