The Long-run Effect of 9/11: Terrorism, Backlash, and the Assimilation of Muslim Immigrants in the West

Eric D. Gould, Esteban F. Klor*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article investigates whether the 9/11 attacks affected the assimilation rate of Muslims in the US. Terror attacks by Islamic groups are likely to induce a backlash against Muslims, thereby raising their costs of assimilation. We find that Muslim immigrants living in states with the sharpest increase in hate crimes also exhibit: greater chances of marrying within their own ethnic group; higher fertility; lower female labour force participation; and lower English proficiency. These findings shed light on the increasing use of terror and concurrent rise in social tensions surrounding Muslim immigrants in the West.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)2064-2114
Number of pages51
JournalEconomic Journal
Volume126
Issue number597
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Royal Economic Society

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