The Obesogenic and Glycemic Effect of Bariatric Surgery in a Family with a Melanocortin 4 Receptor Loss-of-Function Mutation

Ronit Grinbaum*, Nahum Beglaibter, Stella Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Lee M. Kaplan, Danny Ben-Zvi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

We report the long-term response to bariatric surgery in a singular family of four adolescents with severe obesity (41–82 kg/m2), homozygous for the C271R loss-of-function mutation in the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), and three adults heterozygous for the same mutation. All patients had similar sociodemographic backgrounds and were followed for an average of 7 years. Three of the four homozygous patients regained their full weight (42–77 kg/m2), while the fourth lost weight but remained obese with a body mass index of 60 kg/m2. Weight regain was associated with relapse of most comorbidities, yet hyperglycemia did not relapse or was delayed. A1c levels were reduced in homozygous and heterozygous patients. The long-term follow-up data on this very unique genetic setting show that weight loss and amelioration of obesity following bariatric surgery require active MC4R signaling, while the improvement in glycemia is in part independent of weight loss. The study validates animal models and demonstrates the importance of biological signaling in the regulation of weight, even after bariatric surgery.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number430
JournalMetabolites
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 11 May 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • OSA
  • bariatric surgery
  • diabetes
  • melanocortin 4 receptor
  • obesity

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