The political consequences of the introduction and the repeal of the direct elections for the prime minister

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the theoretical logic behind the argument that the transition to a two-ballot system led to split voting, and that the return to a single ballot may be expected to reverse this trend. It argues that the changes in the electoral system that led to changes in voting patterns specifically split voting in the 1996 and 1999 elections and a reversal of this trend in the 2003 elections. It examines whether the introduction of the direct elections led to any significant change in the relative power of the major parties, or whether the changes were no more than typical fluctuations between elections. The chapter also discusses whether the return to the old electoral system has returned Israel's political parties to the situation that existed prior to the implementation of the direct elections for the prime minister, or whether this reform has left its mark even after being abolished.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationThe Elections in Israel 2003
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages33-61
Number of pages29
ISBN (Electronic)9781351322270
ISBN (Print)0765802686, 9780765802682
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2005 by Taylor & Francis. All rights reserved.

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