The relationship between allergen-induced tissue eosinophilia and markers of repair and remodeling in human atopic skin

Simon Phipps, Sun Ying, Arun Wangoo, Yee Ean Ong, Francesca Levi-Schaffer, A. Barry Kay*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

127 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several in vitro studies suggest that eosinophils may play a role in fibrosis, remodeling, and repair processes associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. However, the relationship in vivo, between allergen-induced tissue eosinophilia and markers of repair has yet to be established in human atopic subjects. Using the allergen-induced cutaneous late-phase reaction as a model of allergic inflammation, we have tested the hypothesis that eosinophil-derived TGF-β1 and IL-13 are temporarily associated with myofibroblast formation and deposition of tenascin and procollagen 1. Biopsies were taken from atopic volunteers at 1, 3, 6, 24, 48, and 72 h after intradermal allergen challenge and were examined by immunohistochemistry. Following the peak of the late-phase reaction (6 h) there were persisting TGF-β1 eosinophils, α-smooth muscle actin+ myofibroblasts, tenascin immunoreactivity, and procollagen-I+ cells 24-48 h postchallenge. Direct evidence of generation of repair markers was obtained by coculture of eosinophils and fibroblasts. This resulted in α-smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity that was inhibitable by neutralizing Abs to TGF-β as well as production of tenascin transcripts and protein product. TGF-β1 and IL-13 also induced tenascin expression. We conclude that TGF-β1 and IL-13, provided partially by eosinophils, contribute to repair and remodeling events in allergic inflammation in human atopic skin.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)4604-4612
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume169
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Oct 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The relationship between allergen-induced tissue eosinophilia and markers of repair and remodeling in human atopic skin'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this