The role of language in concern and disregard for others in the first years of life.

Soo Hyun Rhee*, Debra L. Boeldt, Naomi P. Friedman, Robin P. Corley, John K. Hewitt, Susan E. Young, Ariel Knafo, Joann Robinson, Irwin D. Waldman, Carol A. Van Hulle, Carolyn Zahn-Waxler

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined the associations between language skills and concern and disregard for others in young children assessed longitudinally at ages 14, 20, 24, and 36 months, testing the hypothesis that language skills have a specific role (distinct from that of general cognitive ability) in the development of concern and disregard for others. We found that higher language skills predicted higher concern for others and lower disregard for others even after controlling for general cognitive ability, whereas the association between general cognitive ability and concern/disregard for others was not significant after controlling for language skills. Language skills at 14 months predicted concern for others at 36 months, and results suggested that the relations between language skills and concern and disregard for others begin early in development. Gender differences in concern and disregard for others were at least partially explained by differences in language skills. These results support the specific role of language skills in concern and disregard for others. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)197-214
Number of pages18
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of language in concern and disregard for others in the first years of life.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this