The utility of a continuous performance test embedded in virtual reality in measuring the effectiveness of MPH treatment in boys with ADHD

Liron Shriki*, Merav Weizer, Yehuda Pollak, Patricia L. Weiss, Albert A. Rizzo, Varda Gross-Tsur

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Continuous performance tasks (CPT) are popular in the diagnostic process of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), providing an objective measure of attention for a disorder with otherwise subjective criteria. AIMS: The study aimed to: 1) examine whether the VR-CPT is sensitive to methylphenidate (MPH); 2) assess how the virtual reality (VR) environment is experienced. METHODS: Twenty boys, 9-17 years, with ADHD underwent 3 CPTs: VR-CPT, the same CPT without VR (no VR-CPT) and the Test of Variables of Attention (T.O.V.A.). Subsequently, those with ADHD repeated the tests 1 hour following MPH ingestion. Immediately following the CPT, the subjects described their subjective experiences on the Short Feedback Questionnaire. Results were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures. RESULTS: MPH reduced the omission and commission errors on all tests to a similar degree. Subjective feelings of enjoyment were most positive for VR-CPT. CONCLUSION: The VR-CPT is a sensitive and user-friendly assessment tool for evaluating the effectiveness of MPH treatment in boys with ADHD.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)18-23, 63
JournalHarefuah
Volume149
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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