Therapists’ responsiveness in the process of ruptures and resolution: Are patients and therapists on the same page?

Maayan Levy Chajmovic*, Orya Tishby

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the association between the rupture-repair process and patients’ and therapists’ perceptions of the therapist’s responsiveness. Method: We used the Rsupture Resolution Rating System to rate early sessions (3–5) in 35 short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy cases. The patients and therapists rated their perceptions of the therapist’s responsiveness after each session using the Patient's Experience of Attunement and Responsiveness (PEAR) Scale. Results: Therapists’ contribution to ruptures was negatively associated with both patients’ and therapists’ PEAR ratings. Confrontation ruptures were negatively associated with patients’ PEAR ratings, whereas there was no significant association with withdrawal ruptures. Resolution was positively associated with both patients’ and therapists’ PEAR ratings. In addition, resolution moderated the negative association between ruptures and patients’ PEAR ratings. Conclusion: The findings emphasize the link between therapists’ responsiveness and the rupture-repair process. They also highlight the significance of providing therapists with the necessary training to recognize these dynamics and engage in discussions about them with their patients when appropriate.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1-12
JournalPsychotherapy Research
Early online date22 Jan 2024
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 22 Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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