Together we will rise? Perceptions of instrumentality and normalization as motivations for joint collective action among the disadvantaged

Siwar Hasan-Aslih*, Ruthie Pliskin, Eric Shuman, Martijn van Zomeren, Tamar Saguy, Eran Halperin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current research examines joint collective action between advantaged and disadvantaged groups, from the perspective of the latter. We hypothesize that joint action poses a dilemma which lies in the tension between perceived instrumentality of joint action (i.e., ability to promote the disadvantaged’s goals) and perceived normalization (i.e., its tendency to blur power relations). We test this idea across three studies in the United States and Israel/Palestine. In Study 1 (n = 361) we manipulated perceptions of joint action from the perspective of a hypothetical character, and in Study 2 (n = 378) we presented participants with an article highlighting the risk and benefit of joint activism. Results showed that perceived instrumentality increases, whereas perceived normalization decreases joint action tendencies. In Study 3 (n = 240), we described a joint action event that taps into some of the themes that induce concerns about normalization. We found that normalization perceptions feed into perceptions of instrumentality, and this occurred mainly among high identifiers, for whom the dilemma is most salient. The implications of these findings for understanding the complexity of joint collective action from the perspective of the disadvantaged are discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)521-540
Number of pages20
JournalGroup Processes and Intergroup Relations
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Keywords

  • collective action
  • intergroup relations
  • normalization
  • power relations
  • social change

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