TORN APART? THE IMPACT OF MANUFACTURING EMPLOYMENT DECLINE ON BLACK AND WHITE AMERICANS

Eric D. Gould*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of manufacturing employment decline on the socioeconomic outcomes within and between black and white Americans since 1960. The analysis shows that manufacturing decline had a negative impact on blacks in terms of their wages, employment, marriage rates, house values, poverty rates, death rates, single parenthood, teen motherhood, child poverty, and child mortality. In addition, the decline in manufacturing increased inequality within the black community for wages and other outcomes. Similar patterns are found for whites, but to a lesser degree—leading to larger gaps between whites and blacks in wages, marriage patterns, poverty, single-parenthood, and death rates.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)770-785
Number of pages16
JournalReview of Economics and Statistics
Volume103
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Received for publication February 6, 2019. Revision accepted for publication January 17, 2020. Editor: Olivier Coibion. ∗Gould: Hebrew University of Jerusalem, CEPR, IZA, and CReAM. I thank the editor, referees, and participants at the ICEF Conference on Applied Economics for helpful comments. Sheri Band Asif provided diligent research assistance. This research was supported by the Israel Science Foundation (grant 1927/18). A supplemental appendix is available online at https://doi.org/10.1162/ rest_a_00918.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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