Total oxidant-scavenging capacities of plasma from glycogen storage disease type Ia patients as measured by cyclic voltammetry, FRAP and luminescence techniques

E. Koren, Ronk Kohen*, J. Lipkin, A. Klar, E. Hershkovitz, I. Ginsburg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

It has been suggested that the very low incidence of atherosclerosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) subjects might be attributed to elevated levels of uric acid, one of the potent low-molecular-weight antioxidants found in plasma. The present communication describes a use of two analytical methods - cyclic voltammetry and ferric reducing ability of plasma - and also two chemiluminescence methods to evaluate the total oxidant-scavenging capacities (TOSC) of plasma from GSD Ia patients. Our results verified the elevation of TOSC in GSD Ia patients and we propose the inclusion of luminescence and cyclic voltammetry assays as reliable methods for estimating TOSC in a variety of clinical disorders. Our findings with the cyclic voltammetry method add support to the assumption that the elevated uric acid levels might be the main contributor to plasma antioxidant capacity and possible protection against atherosclerosis.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)651-659
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Acknowledgements This work was supported by an endowment fund by the late Dr. S.M. Robbins of Cleveland, OH, USA, by the Israel Science Foundation (grant no. 241/04), and by the Yedidut Foundation (Mexico). Ron Kohen is affiliated with the David R. Bloom Center for Pharmacy and the Brettler Center for research in molecular pharmacology and therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

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