U.S. adoption of computerized physician order entry systems: Ownership status appears to influence hospitals' adoption the most, and government hospitals are leading the way

David M. Cutler*, Naomi E. Feldman, Jill R. Horwitz

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been shown to reduce preventable, potential adverse events. Despite this evidence, fewer than 5 percent of U.S. hospitals have fully implemented these systems. We assess empirically alternative reasons for low CPOE implementation using data from various sources. We find that CPOE is related to hospital ownership and teaching status; government and teaching hospitals are much more likely than other hospital types are to invest in CPOE. Hospital profitability is not associated with CPOE investment. Although greater diffusion of CPOE is needed, it might have to await continuing publicity efforts and substantial reimbursement system changes.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1654-1663
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Affairs
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'U.S. adoption of computerized physician order entry systems: Ownership status appears to influence hospitals' adoption the most, and government hospitals are leading the way'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this