Use of a sustained release chlorhexidine varnish as treatment of oral necrobacillosis in macropus spp.

Meytal Bakal-Weiss*, Doron Steinberg, Michael Friedman, Irith Gati, Nili Avni-Magen, Elizabeth Kaufman, Eran Lavy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oral necrobacillosis or lumpy jaw is a common cause of morbidity and mortality affecting captive macropods. This article describes several cases of a new treatment regimen using a sustained release chlorhexidine varnish applied locally to the teeth and the gingivae of two Macropus species, eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus gigantus) from Gan-Garoo Australian Park and a red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus fruticus) from The Tisch Family Zoological Gardens in Jerusalem. The varnish was applied using a horsehair paint brush as three 1- to 2-mm thick layers. The active ingredient in the varnish was the disinfectant chlorhexidine. Results indicated that use of an intraoral sustained release varnish significantly shortens the treatment time and may prevent recurrence.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)371-373
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • Chlorhexidine
  • Lumpy jaw
  • Macropus spp
  • Oral necrobacillosis
  • Sustained release varnish

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