Using Job Analysis for Identifying the Desired Competencies of 21st-Century Surgeons for Improving Trainees Selection

Noa Gazit*, Gilad Ben-Gal, Ron Eliashar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The current selection for surgical training is based on ineffective methods. In order to identify or to develop more valid selection tools to improve the selection, it is necessary to first define what are the competencies that are most important for success in contemporary surgery. Therefore, the current study aims to identify what competencies are required for success as a surgeon in the 21st-century and to evaluate their relative importance for selection for surgical training. METHODS: Job analysis was conducted using a mixed-methods design. First, 104 senior surgeons from all surgical fields from various hospitals in Israel were interviewed in order to query their perceptions of competencies associated with success as a surgeon. Their answers were coded and analyzed to create a list of important competencies. Next, a larger sample of 1,102 surgeons and residents from all surgical fields completed a questionnaire in which they rated the importance of each competency in the list for success as a surgeon and for selection for surgical training in the 21st-century. RESULTS: Twenty-four competencies (five technical skills, six cognitive abilities, 13 personality characteristics) were identified in the interview analysis. Analysis of the questionnaire's data revealed that all 24 competencies were perceived as important for success as a surgeon in the 21st-century as well as for selection for surgical training. The perceived importance of personality characteristics was higher than both cognitive abilities (p < 0.001) and technical skills (p < 0.001). The results did not differ between different surgical fields. CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-four competencies were identified as important for 21st-century surgeons and for selection for surgical training. Although all competencies were perceived as important, personality characteristics were perceived as more important than technical skills and cognitive abilities. This updated definition of required competencies may aid in developing more valid selection methods of candidates for surgical training.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)81-92
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Author(s)

Keywords

  • competency
  • job analysis
  • non-technical skills
  • selection
  • surgical training
  • technical skills

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