Very high birth weight of offspring is associated with an increased risk of leukemia in their mothers: Results of a population-based cohort study

Ora Paltiel*, Rebecca Yanetz, Ronit Calderon-Margalit, Orly Manor, Nir Sharon, Susan Harlap, Yehiel Friedlander

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the association between birth weight and childhood leukemia is well described, the relation between a child's birth weight and parental risk of leukemia is unknown. We linked data from the Jerusalem Perinatal Study to the Israel Cancer Registry to ascertain the incidence of leukemia in mothers and fathers in relation to their offspring's birth weight. Birth weight ≥4500 g in any of the offspring was associated with a >3-fold risk of leukemia in mothers, but not fathers. Potential mechanisms include shared exposures of high birth weight infants and their mothers, possibly to radiation or growth factors, or genetic pathways leading to both high birth weight and leukemia.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1709-1714
Number of pages6
JournalLeukemia Research
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Birth weight
  • Intergenerational effects
  • Leukemia
  • Macrosomia

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