When ideology matters: Moral conviction and the association between ideology and policy preferences in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict

Michal Reifen Tagar*, G. Scott Morgan, Eran Halperin, Linda J. Skitka

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Do people's policy preferences toward outgroups in intractable conflict consistently correspond with political ideology? To what extent are policy-related cleavages between the political right and left in such contexts fueled by moral conviction and emotions? Analyses of a survey of Jewish-Israelis (N=119) conducted immediately after a war between Israelis and Palestinians revealed little to no ideological differences in acceptance of "collateral damage," support for retribution, or support for compromise when positions about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict were devoid of moral fervor. Those on the left and right endorsed polarized policy preferences only when their positions about the conflict were held with moral conviction. Presence or absence of guilt about harm to Palestinians mediated the effects of moral conviction on policy preferences in this context.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

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