WHEN TEACHER-STUDENT DISCOURSE REACH IMPASSE: THE ROLE OF COMPUTER GAME AND ATTENTIVE PEER

Orit Broza*, Yifat Ben David Kolikant

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Researchers traced the learning processes of 26 low-achieving students studying subtraction of decimal numbers, as they worked in small groups within a rich learning environment involving a computerized game, play money, peer interactions and teacher mediation. Data sources were videotaped sessions, worksheets, observations, and pre-and post-program teacher evaluations. Results indicate that low achieving students can build new significant knowledge, to participate in a reflective mathematical discourse, and benefit from it. Yet, the setting of computer games with an attentive peer served a fertile platform for strategies to emerge and consolidate..

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 44th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, 2021
EditorsMaitree Inprasitha, Narumon Changsri, Nisakorn Boonsena
PublisherPsychology of Mathematics Education (PME)
Pages105-112
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9786169383017
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes
Event44th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, PME 2021 - Virtual, Online
Duration: 19 Jul 202122 Jul 2021

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
Volume2
ISSN (Print)0771-100X
ISSN (Electronic)2790-3648

Conference

Conference44th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, PME 2021
CityVirtual, Online
Period19/07/2122/07/21

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME). All rights reserved.

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