Winning a seat at the table: Strategic routes by emerging powers to gain privileges in exclusive formal clubs

Gadi Heimann*, Deganit Paikowsky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Established powers enjoy privileges in world politics coveted by emerging powers. These privileges vary in their level of institutionalization: full formal privileges, partial formal privileges, and informal privileges. We identify two alternative strategic routes through which emerging powers target these three types of privileges: a top-down and a bottom-up route. We analyze two factors that impact the choice between these two routes: restrictiveness of eligibility criteria for winning privileges, and the expected levels of opposition by both established powers and outsiders. We examine the impact of these factors on two cases in which India negotiated privileges: India’s top-down campaign to win a permanent seat on the UN Security Council; and India’s bottom-up campaign to enter the nuclear club as a de facto nuclear weapon state. Highly restrictive eligibility criteria along with high levels of opposition drove India to gradually seek nuclear privileges through a bottom-up route.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)594-621
Number of pages28
JournalContemporary Security Policy
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • India
  • Institutional power shift theory
  • Security Council
  • emerging powers
  • institutional adaptation
  • nuclear

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Winning a seat at the table: Strategic routes by emerging powers to gain privileges in exclusive formal clubs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this