Yes I can: Expected success promotes actual success in emotion regulation

Yochanan E. Bigman*, Iris B. Mauss, James J. Gross, Maya Tamir

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

74 Scopus citations

Abstract

People who expect to be successful in regulating their emotions tend to experience less frequent negative emotions and are less likely to suffer from depression. It is not clear, however, whether beliefs about the likelihood of success in emotion regulation can shape actual emotion regulation success. To test this possibility, we manipulated participants' beliefs about the likelihood of success in emotion regulation and assessed their subsequent ability to regulate their emotions during a negative emotion induction. We found that participants who were led to expect emotion regulation to be more successful were subsequently more successful in regulating their emotional responses, compared to participants in the control condition. Our findings demonstrate that expected success can contribute to actual success in emotion regulation.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1380-1387
Number of pages8
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Oct 2016

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Taylor & Francis.

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • beliefs
  • efficacy
  • emotion regulation
  • expectancies

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